Portland Cement

Manufactured from some of the earth’s most common minerals – limestone and shale – Portland cement is combined with stone, sand and water to create a chemical reaction that becomes concrete.

The limestone and shale are finely ground and moved through a kiln, where they are burned at 2800 degrees Fahrenheit to form a new material called clinker. A small amount of gypsum is blended with the clinker and then ground again into a fine powder to form cement.

Modern Portland cement can trace its roots to 1756 when a British civil engineer experimented with various limestones and additives to construct a lighthouse. The name “Portland” comes from the cement’s similarity to Portland stone, which is quarried in England on the Isle of Portland.

Monarch has been creating high-quality Portland cement at our Humboldt plant since it opened, and all of our Portland cements conform to ASTM C-150.

Type I – Otherwise known as normal Portland cement, Type I is a common-purpose cement for general construction uses, including pavements, concrete buildings, floors, precast concrete products and other uses.

Type I/II – Our Type I/II Portland cement meets the requirements of both Type I and Type II, including strength and composition requirements, and can be used in projects where either type is required. More cost-effective than storing both types, Type I/II can be used on most concrete construction projects, including those that expose the concrete to harsh environmental conditions.

Type III – Ground finer with a quicker reaction time than Type I, concrete made with Type III has a high early strength rate. It has a higher 28-day strength than Type I, achieving approximately 70 percent of that strength after three days.

Download Safety & Test Data:

  • Safety Data Sheet
  • Mill Test – Type I
  • Mill Tests – Type I/II
  • Mill Tests – Type III

Portland Cement

Manufactured from some of the earth’s most common minerals – limestone and shale – Portland cement is combined with stone, sand and water to create a chemical reaction that becomes concrete.

The limestone and shale are finely ground and moved through a kiln, where they are burned at 2800 degrees Fahrenheit to form a new material called clinker. A small amount of gypsum is blended with the clinker and then ground again into a fine powder to form cement.

Modern Portland cement can trace its roots to 1756 when a British civil engineer experimented with various limestones and additives to construct a lighthouse. The name “Portland” comes from the cement’s similarity to Portland stone, which is quarried in England on the Isle of Portland.

Monarch has been creating high-quality Portland cement at our Humboldt plant since it opened in 1909, and all of our Portland cements conform to ASTM C-150.

Type I – Otherwise known as normal Portland cement, Type I is a common-purpose cement for general construction uses, including pavements, concrete buildings, floors, precast concrete products and others uses.

Type I/II – Our Type I/II Portland cement meets the requirements of both Type I and Type II, including strength and composition requirements, and can be used in projects where either type is required. More cost-effective than storing both types, Type I/II can be used on most concrete construction projects, including those that expose the concrete to harsh environmental conditions.

Type III – Ground finer with a quicker reaction than Type I, concrete made with Type III has a high early strength rate. It has a higher 28-day strength than Type I, achieving approximately 70 percent of that strength after three days.

Our Process

After producing cement for more than 110 years, we’ve perfected the consistency and quality of our products. However, we’re always working to implement new technology-driven efficiencies to ensure we never stop improving.

Our Process

After producing cement for more than 110 years, we’ve perfected the consistency and quality of our products. However, we’re always working to implement new technology-driven efficiencies to ensure we never stop improving.